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Vienna: Krapfen Pastries and Carnival

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photograph courtesy of borya
photograph courtesy of borya

Austria is entering the end of Carnival and, beginning today, will be in fasting mode. In Austria, Carnival is called Fasching.

Vienna has survived this year’s Fasching more or less intact. The Vienna Opera Ball, the extensive media coverage courtesy of Paris Hilton (construction magnate Richard Lugner’s special guest this year), and the numerous balls leading up to the start of the Lenten season have all come and gone.

As far as we’re concerned, the most important element of Fasching is Krapfen.

Krapfen is the equivalent of the American doughnut or the British/Australian pancake traditionally eaten during Shrove Tuesday. It is called Berliner Pfannkuchen in Germany. In Italy, it’s called Krafen.

Krapfen is a pastry of yeast dough fried in either fat or oil. Krapfen are dusted with sugar or iced. They are usually injected with a jam filling after being cooked. They are so tasty they’ll make even staid adults want to scarf a dozen in one sitting.

Krapfen are good and cheap, too. They cost between €.70 and €.90 apiece.

About the author

She is an Asian female, in her 30s, trying to integrate herself in the city of Vienna. She is the wife and lover to R, a mother to a wonderful boy named Boo the Rascal, and friends to a few people. She loves dark red and dark blue, doesn't mind the trivialities of life, dabbles in calligraphy, collects throwpillows, likes to write and dreams that one day she will have her own castle fronting a beach somewhere in Southeast Asia.

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One thought on “Vienna: Krapfen Pastries and Carnival”

  1. I had a vanilla Krapfen while in Switzerland. It was so delicious. I wish I could buy them here in the U.S. this krapfen wasn’t like a donut it was like a flat rectangular pastry. Is there anywhere I can find the recipe or buy them in the U.S.?

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